Most Memorable Hunts - Buckshotap

Thought I would share a couple of my most exciting/memorable hunts. Maybe inspire some others to share as good medicine for the cabin fever I have. The buff weighed 2,000# before field dressing. Almost got in trouble as I shot him at 25 yds. with only a cameraman present. Had split up from the backup gun (outfitter) to scout for buffs. The rule was no shooting unless the gun was present. I was a bad boy! First buff kill with a bow in 10 yrs. as they had a hunter almost get killed the last time they tried. The group was a bunch of guys I booked to hunt with the Montana outfitter that I worked for in my archery business days. The non-typical deer....Well, what can I say?

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Re:

Buckshotap
February 6th, 2014 01:02:56pm

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In the group picture, some elk were taken with a bow & some with a muzzleloader. The non-typical doe was taken here in MO.

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Re:

Chuck DeLeeuw
February 7th, 2014 12:02:03pm

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Not sure if this was so much a memorable hunt as it was a memorable experience ... Back in about 89 or 90 (I forgot), we were up in Ontario moose hunting. The story we had was that this area had been closed by the MNR for 15 years and the year we were there was the first time it had been opened back up for hunting. The trek back to where we hunted was almost a one day trip in itself, with atv's, rowboats, argos, the whole nine yards so obviously many of the animals we encountered probably had never seen a human being before. We found that indeed, all the animals we encountered literally had no fear - especially the wolves. One day we were back at the camp for lunch and I decided to walk down this old, old logging road to shoot some judos. As I got some distance from the camp, I had an eerie feeling I can't describe come over me, but I knew I was not alone - I was being watched. Lo and behold - I was. Somewhat unnerved, I slowly turned around and not 30 yards behind was a jet black wolf, just sitting on the trail looking at me - much in the same way a dog would just sit. He did not seem at all tense or threatened by my presence. My gut feeling was that he was just curious but I wasn't about to wait to find out. I yelled a little and waved my arms and he just got up, slowly walked about 10 yards down the trail in the opposite direction, turned and gave me one last look like, "What in the world is THAT?" and just quietly turned off the trail into the thick bush and disappeared. LOL, needless to say I didn't waste any time at all getting my hind end back to the camp. I hate to admit it but it shook me up a little bit. But I also have to say that when I think back to that trip, it is always one of the first things I think of and it was definitely one of the most exhilarating experiences I have ever had while hunting - I will never forget it.

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Chuck DeLeeuw
February 7th, 2014 12:02:59pm

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One more comes to mind... Where we deer hunt, losing deer to bears and coyotes has been an ongoing problem for some time. A few years back on our last night of hunting, I drilled a doe pretty good. She took off and collapsed about 40 yards away. Being the last night, I waited about 15 minutes, took down the steps and the stand, went and gutted the deer and dragged her back to the stand location. I was going to attempt to drag out the deer, my bow, pack, clothes, stand and steps all in one trip but only made it about 20 yards before I figured out it would be too much. I dropped the deer and brought everything else out to the two track and was back to the deer about 20-25 minutes later. Upon arriving, I came upon a really good sized bear who already had laid claim to the gut pile. Thinking of course that the bear had the deer on it's mind and was going to follow the blood trail from the gut pile to the deer, I started yelling and waving at the bear to get him to hit the road. After two weeks of terrible deer hunting, there was no way in the world I was let that bear have that deer. Most of our encounters with bears up to that point had been uneventful with every bear leaving as quickly as possible. But much to my surprise, this one wasn't real anxious to leave. He stood on his hind legs and looked at me, snapping his jaws several times. He bluffed/charged twice to within few yards of me and then reluctantly backed away, all the while looking back snapping his jaws as he wandered slowly back into the woods. Needless to say, I BACKED all the way out of the woods to the two track with the deer. 8~) Even though I've bear hunted many, many times from Ontario to Alberta (my favorite thing to do), often time from the ground at 10 yards from the bait, far and away that's been my most eventful encounter with bears. He was an ornery bugger for sure.

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Buckshotap
February 7th, 2014 01:02:47pm

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Very nicely described. I think one reason they were so memorable is you were close to an animal that could kill you. I had never been close to or hunted an animal that could kill me. The guide had oriented me as to the danger a buff presents. He said after you shoot one they are even more dangerous thus the back up gun rule. He was not happy with me or the cameraman. We had made several stalks each ending with the buffs blasting out of the area. I was amazed at how wild they were. My shot actually came about when the cameraman & I made it back to our rendezvous point to meet the guide & settled into tall grass to wait for him. The buff came up to 25 yds. & I whispered I was going to shoot him. Cameraman said there was no gun so.... I said I may not get another chance. Luckily the buff ran in the opposite direction. There was no timber for cover for about 100 yds. but I figured I could out run the cameraman if necessary. Heard the cameraman go whoooo & felt his breath on the back of my neck as he had the camera virtually laying over my right shoulder. Not the end of the story!

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Buckshotap
February 7th, 2014 01:02:18pm

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After the guide arrived, we waited an hr. to start trailing. The 28 " arrow pus broad head went all the way in dead center of the lungs. Couldn't see it sticking out on either side. Found the buff laying head up in thick timber. Wanted to sneak up & finish him but the guide wouldn't let me. After an hr. of watching him, he had not moved. Figured he was nearly dead. Wrong! Convinced the guide to let me sneak in for a finishing shot with him & the gun at my back. Only condition was he would shoot the buff if it so much as looked our way. He said after they are shot, they will charge & knock you down. Then, roll on you to kill you. Stalked up to 15 yds. as the buff still had not moved. Released the arrow which went into his lungs again. That rascal instantly shot up & out of his bed like a rocket! I nearly lost everything I had! Luckily he ran away from us so it remained strictly a bow kill. The cameraman was dancing a jig as he had some real exciting footage. After all that, we went back to camp to change our pants & prepare to get 2,000#s of buff out of the timber.

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Chuck DeLeeuw
February 8th, 2014 06:02:44am

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"There was no timber for cover for about 100 yds. but I figured I could out run the cameraman if necessary. Heard the cameraman go whoooo & felt his breath on the back of my neck as he had the camera virtually laying over my right shoulder." LOL... great story! Indeed it's a whole different thing to hunt things that can bite you back. 8~)

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Buckshotap
February 8th, 2014 10:02:26am

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Man! I sure would like to go BEAR hunting! Have always been fond of grizzlers since Chuck Adams told me the story of his world record griz. He's a real nice guy based on the few times I've talked with him. You're lucky to have bear encounters. Hey just thought of a new defense against bear attacks. Carry a jar of honey & throw the opened jar at the bear. Or, maybe a sack of donuts would do. If no bears come around, you could eat them. I like the taste of that.

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Chuck DeLeeuw
February 14th, 2014 11:02:49am

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Lots of good outfitters out there Allen. I go every spring and could never get enough of it! (black bear, not grizz)

Re: sandman

Sandman
February 14th, 2014 12:02:11pm
My most memorable hunt was last December when I shot my 11 pointer with blackwidow bow my mom got me before she lost her battle with breast cancer.I can remember saying to my self 'HERE WE GO MOM' when I was drawing on that buck .I smoked him and when I heard him crash I couldn't stop shaking,by far that wasn't the biggest I have shot but its the most shook up I have ever gotten.I will always remember that feeling.I fletched my arrows pink that year in her memory she was a super cool mom .

Re:

Toby @ BW
February 14th, 2014 01:02:22pm

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Sandman, Sorry to hear about your mom. I'm sure she would have been very proud of your buck also. Thanks for sharing!

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Buckshotap
February 15th, 2014 06:02:04am

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My dad made me my first bow out of a hickory limb when I was just a boy. After that, it was Robin Hood all the way. I may not have ever got so addicted to bow hunting had it not been for Dad. He later bought me my first real bow, a Pearson recurve. Killed my first deer with it in 1967. He threw the wood on the spark that created the fire. I'll never forget that. Robin Hood, Fred Bear & all the others of the day created the dreams.

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DennySturgisJr
February 15th, 2014 10:02:07am

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Sandman, that IS a very special buck and sorry about your Mom.

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Chuck DeLeeuw
February 15th, 2014 03:02:12pm

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Great story Sandman. Best wishes for many more memorable hunts and great memories of your mom as well. Sorry for your loss.

Re:

Buckshotap
February 16th, 2014 08:02:35am

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Those of us who had/have great moms & dads are very lucky. Memories like sandman's are special. When we have an appropriate occasion to share them with others, I think we should. It keeps our memories alive & often causes us to take time to reflect on those memories as did sandman's comments. I was double lucky to have a great mom & dad. Mom didn't hunt but liked to fish & we did a lot of that. She always prepared great meals for her hungry hunters coming home after a long day afield. Her smile made them taste even better.

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Pinecone
February 16th, 2014 06:02:27pm

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Sandman, you captured the greatest thing about all of our hunts: the people we meet and care for along the way. It is obvious that you and your Mom had and have a very special relationship. Thanks so much for allowing us to share a little piece of it and congratulations on your buck! My personal favorite BW hunting memories were actually 2013 when I took the first traditional archery whitetails I've killed since 2009. Moving to the east coast dried up my hunting opportunities for a time, but thanks to my bird dog puppy and a few new friends,(this is a story in itself), last season I was blessed to have more places to hunt than I had time to hunt them. The two fat whitetails that fell to my BW were taken clean with a 56" PCHX Cocobola and Yew, 41# @ my 28" draw. It sure was great to be back in the woods with the Widow!

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Chuck DeLeeuw
February 19th, 2014 05:02:57pm

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Here you go Buckshotap... here's a memorable bear hunt for you. 8~) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yi_Krx6C_7w

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Buckshotap
February 24th, 2014 04:02:03pm

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Chuck, I have that DVD & have watched it no less than 50 times! That would be my dream hunt. Stalking along rivers looking for GRIZ! The raft charge experience would have caused the raft to be over loaded had I been in it. Wow, what a rush.

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Chuck DeLeeuw
February 24th, 2014 04:02:46pm

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Good one wasn't it? I'm not a big fan of most of the outdoor programming but I do like Fred. A grizzly or brown bear hunt sounds like a great video project for Denny and Darryl and their BW bows. 8~)

Re:

Buckshotap
February 24th, 2014 08:02:16pm

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I don't know about that. What if GRIZ got Denny before he's posted his recipe (another thread) for tree rat stew? I wouldn't like that. I think Darryl could probably run faster.

Re:

Buckshotap
February 24th, 2014 08:02:38pm

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I'm on a quest for tree rat stew. Anyone got the hint?
Allen Payne

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Allen Payne

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Chuck DeLeeuw

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Chuck DeLeeuw

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Allen Payne

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Allen Payne

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Chuck DeLeeuw

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Allen Payne

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Chuck DeLeeuw

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Sandman
TOBY ESSICK

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Allen Payne

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DennySturgisJr

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Chuck DeLeeuw

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Allen Payne

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Claudia Eisenmann

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Chuck DeLeeuw

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Allen Payne

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Chuck DeLeeuw

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Allen Payne

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Allen Payne

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